Fm8 Synthesis Essay

The words Frequency Modulation Synthesis can really sound scary and daunting. I know when I first tried to understand this form of synthesis, it went right over my head. I stuck to other forms of synthesis for years until I realized the full power of FM Synthesis. Native Instruments’ FM8 really makes the FM process a lot simpler. By getting familiar with the interface can really speed up the process on education yourself on Frequency Modulation. I will show you how you can create a simple FM synth by making use of the operators and getting them to frequency modulate, and self-modulate each other. 

Step 1 – Start with the first Operator

I want to create a nice Digital sounding FM Bass. First make sure FM is set to Mono under the Master Tab. Then switch to Expert section. This is where I’ll start initializing the operators and begin the FM process.

By default the New Sound has the F Operator initialized with a Sine waveform. 

Sine Wave:

Right click on the other operators to initialize them. You will notice that they go from a grey text color to a white text color. On the bottom bar is the volume parameter for each of these operators. You can also choose different waveforms for these operators. I have chosen a Triangle waveform for the D operator.

Extra Operators:


Step 2 – Build Up Some More

Keep going and add more operators. I have added another Operator (C), with a Short Tristate waveform. Adjust the volumes for each operator until you are happy with how they all sound together. Now lets get to the frequency modulation. Line the D and F operators up and on that block in the modulation matrix start dragging up. I have dialed in a setting of 51. Do the same between C and D with a setting of 13. Next up are further steps on modulating operators.

Step 3 – Get Them to Self Modulate

You can even self modulate operators. On the F operator drag up on the modulation box just above this. This will get the F operator to modulate with itself.

Self Modulation:


Step 4 –  Panning and Detuning

The box under the Volume parameters allows you to pan the different operators. I have panned C slightly left and D slightly right to add some separation to the synth sound.

Also what helps thicken up the sound is to slightly detune the operators. I have detuned the C and D operators by a fraction, but it makes all the difference to the bass sound.

Step 5 –  The Noise Operator

Operator X is the Noise operator. It comes in real handy to introduce more attack to the sound. Initialize the X operator. The Noise Amp is sitting at 9 o’clock. And the Noise Cutoff at 5 o'clock. I have left the other parameters at their default location. Listen now how the noise has given the bass sound more attack and presence.

Noise Operator:


Step 6 –  The Master Section

To finalize this sound let's move to the Master tab and do a few more tweaks. Increase the Unison Voices to 8. Increase the Detune to 16 and the Pan to 76. This will add a minor detuned effect to the synth sound and the Pan parameter will spread the synth sound further across the audio spectrum.

Now move to the Quality section and increase the Analog and Digital parameters as desired. I have dialed in a small Analog amount of 17 and quite a high Digital amount of 76. This will introduce digital artifacts into the signal and slightly bitcrush the sound source.

Take a listen now how the bass sound has transformed. Throw a beat over this and you will really hear how this simple FM bass patch pierces through the mix.

Master Tweaks:


Here is the FM8 synth over a drum loop:


Conclusion

As you can see when you familiarize yourself with a few of FM8’s interface parameters, you can really design your own unique FM patches. You can even take this further and start exploring some of the other tabs and parameters such as the Effects and Arpeggiator sections for further sound design.

Take a look at the following tutorials for further synthesis techniques:

NI 210: FM8: FM Synthesis and Sound Design

NI 306: Massive: Dubstep Sound Design

NI 202: Razor

Gary Hiebner is an enthusiastic South African Sound Designer and Apple Tech Head! Gary has been involved in the South African music industry for the decade, and in this time has also been involved in the sound design and music production for many advertising agencies and media houses. Gary is a devoted Logic and Ableton user, but he al... Read More

AuthorLive 9 Operator or FM8?
Rex Coil 7
I am a very recent Live 9 convert. 24 friggin years riding the Cakewalk train and since I started using the Live Lite 8 freebie (and subsequently bought Live 9 during the very short duration offer to Live Lite registered users for Live 9 Standard for $329) I am more and more knocwed stupid by Ableton's badassedness.

So ok, I have ~analogue~ kicked square in the ass with my Dot Com modular 5 VCO - 3 VCF system. I also have a little covey of Nord Micro Modulars for those 20bit VA sounds. The other little niche I want to fill in is the FM stuff. I have had FM7 for like .... since fire was discovered or something. But I've been considering sticking with Ableton almost exclusively simply because I love the look and feel, the workflow makes a ton of sense, and it all just friggin works!

So, that said, does Live 9 Operator hold it's own against FM8? I know Operator "only" has four oscillators but there's the power of The Rack that supports Operator in the regard of adding processing power.

I only have Live 9 Standard (no Operator like a bitch!) ... Otherwise I'd really test the hell out of Operator my damn self.

I am just so impressed with what Live 9 delivers, and I am TOTALLY planning on upgrading the Suite to be able to have Max, Sampler, and Operator. And I am made to understand that Max has been tweaked up to provide CV outputs and modulating hardware by people far more talented than I. Which means I can use some Max programs to add to Silent Way (which is also coming on board very soon).

Sooo .... FM8 v Operator .... can Operator (with the power of Live 9 behind it) be made to handle itself against FM8? I don't have to have super close to DX7 tones, just really great FM/PM sounds .... gotta have Teh Digi to add to my synth rig!

Talk at me ....
radamsI am pretty sure you can run Live in demo mode and try all of their instruments . Saving will be disabled .
I have not used FM8 but I have used Operator a lot .
It is extremely versatile and it's integration into Live's workflow makes it a good choice for me.
Operator has a lot of features . Using the manual and some tutorials will helpOldstenchFM8 is an amazing synth. I've never used Operator to compare though.EtanI have been using both Fm8 and Operator a lot over the years. I tend to lean more towards Fm8 because it is such a versatile instrument.

They are both very capable fm synths but Fm8 can do much wider range of sounds. It is great for pads and evolving soundscapes (morphing feature and arsenal of different audio effects).

On the other hand the Operator in combination with ableton racks excels in drum and weird percussive sounds department, Fm8 can hardly compare with it also because of the level of integration which is possible in ableton.

Both synths are very good for bass sounds, Fm8 can produce very clean and silky bass sounds while Operator rocks in the beefy department.

Also Fm8 has great and quite advanced arpeggiator and syncable envelopes which Operator doesnt have (you can still loop them though) so for tempo synced sounds fm8 is way ahead.

Fm8 has quite advanced routing possibilities between operators while Operator has them preconfigured.

As for emulations of classic Yamaha DX7 sounds and other piano, string and bell sounds Fm8 beats operator anytime.

So I would say for general purpose fm synth go with Fm8, but if you want it more for drum sounds, lead and bass sounds and with high level of integration in ableton go for Operator.

Hope this helps you with your decision or just go with an easy way- get both Rex Coil 7
radams wrote:
I am pretty sure you can run Live in demo mode and try all of their instruments . Saving will be disabled .
I have not used FM8 but I have used Operator a lot .
It is extremely versatile and it's integration into Live's workflow makes it a good choice for me.
Operator has a lot of features . Using the manual and some tutorials will help
I just tried Live Lite 8 and it doesn't have Operator ... so I guess I can download the 30 day Live 9 demo.

It's ok though, it gave me an excuse to mess with Live a little more ... it's just so bloody intuitive! Very easy to use, and each time I futz with it I just love what I can make it do. When I end up getting Suite I really want to try that beatbox-to-miditrack trick that it can do. It's so much easier for me to "Beasty" out a drum riff than it is to goof with a drum machine or sequencer! There's just so much I want to try out.

Rex Coil 7
Etan wrote:
I have been using both Fm8 and Operator a lot over the years. I tend to lean more towards Fm8 because it is such a versatile instrument.

They are both very capable fm synths but Fm8 can do much wider range of sounds. It is great for pads and evolving soundscapes (morphing feature and arsenal of different audio effects).

On the other hand the Operator in combination with ableton racks excels in drum and weird percussive sounds department, Fm8 can hardly compare with it also because of the level of integration which is possible in ableton.

Both synths are very good for bass sounds, Fm8 can produce very clean and silky bass sounds while Operator rocks in the beefy department.

Also Fm8 has great and quite advanced arpeggiator and syncable envelopes which Operator doesnt have (you can still loop them though) so for tempo synced sounds fm8 is way ahead.

Fm8 has quite advanced routing possibilities between operators while Operator has them preconfigured.

As for emulations of classic Yamaha DX7 sounds and other piano, string and bell sounds Fm8 beats operator anytime.

So I would say for general purpose fm synth go with Fm8, but if you want it more for drum sounds, lead and bass sounds and with high level of integration in ableton go for Operator.

Hope this helps you with your decision or just go with an easy way- get both
Wow ... tons of help there ... thanks for taking the time to provide a lot of useful information.

I have FM7 if I simply must have classic DX7 sounds (there really isn't one that I know of that I ~must~ have though, I have a 1977 Rhodes Stage 73 that has been worked over pretty well and has a very potent preamp that gives me great Dyno-My-Rhodes sounds along with a real deal classic MXR Phase 90). The only other sound that I'm not even sure is a DX7 that I might want to emulate ... as in clone ... is the bass riff from the song "Danger Zone" from Top Gun. But there's 400 ways to produce that sound anyhow.

Let me ask you this, can't Operator be used with the Max sequencer or the Live 9 Arpeggiator to produce various modulations? I mean, how powerful is Ableton in the manner of internal control routings and internal audio routings? Can it do modulations with audio signals within it's self?

I'm certain I am buying the Suite upgrade sometime soon (probably even before I finish upgrading my computer to use Live 9 to it's fullest extent), I'm kinda hoping that it will even replace Reaktor 5 (that I just bought yesterday on sale for $99!!!). I figure I should be able to sell Reaktor for the hunsky that I spent on it as soon as it is no longer on sale, so no harm done (and selling it is within the license agreement, I looked).

That way my synth studio will be slimmed down to my Dot Com, Nord Micro Modulars (god's favorite synth), OPXProII for those drippy Oberheim pads, and Ableton. Add a pair of Korg KP3 Kaoss pads and a digital turntable as a unique additional tool. Done.

Mondo cooly.slovoI dunno why you wouldn't jump on Operator if you like it, but it's not cheap unless you want the other stuff too -- I like Collision and Sampler but not too enamored with the other Ableton instruments personally. FM8 is a much "better" instrument in that it is far more powerful, but Operator is extremely easy to use. I found the FM8 interface to be extremely unintuitive at first, but once I rtfm it's pretty amazing. Of course it's not as lightweight as Operator. You could probably run 100 instances of Operator at the same time with a fast CPU.

Also some may jump on me for saying this -- quite possibly I am not using the right settings on FM8 but I would say as a trend Operator has a bit of a "sweeter" (less harsh) tone out of the box. But again, unless you're desperate to conserve CPU, you can use FM8's brashness if you want, and also just mellow it out with with a FET compressor or something when you want that more-organic chip sound.CJ MillerYou can try Operator or FM8 as trial software. So why not install and try them? Then you can tell us what you think.

If you are interested in Live routing flexibility, then why are you hoping it can replace Reaktor? Reaktor seems far more flexible to me. If you are so sold on Live's way of doing things, what do you prefer about it?

Etan wrote:
Fm8 has quite advanced routing possibilities between operators while Operator has them preconfigured.


I didn't know that, this would make up my mind.Etan
Rex Coil 7 wrote:

Let me ask you this, can't Operator be used with the Max sequencer or the Live 9 Arpeggiator to produce various modulations? I mean, how powerful is Ableton in the manner of internal control routings and internal audio routings? Can it do modulations with audio signals within it's self?


Sure thing, you can do all that and much more with m4l, especially if you are aiming for more experimental stuff you should definitely go for Operator. You have tons of various arpeggiators and other sequencing devices and in combination with instrument and drum racks you wont get bored soon.

On the other hand FM8 is a very capable and self contained synth.
And there is something really sweet about its arpeggiator, people are requesting midi output feature for a long time, so it is not just me.

Morphing is another really strong and unique point of FM8. Everything from really smooth morphing and evolving sounds to abrupt and dramatic changes (you can even drag and drop different sounds from sound browser and drop them directly into one of the four corners of the morphing pad/square). So things can get quite far from classic DX7 sounds and other generic fm sounds.CJ Miller
Etan wrote:
Morphing is another really strong and unique point of FM8. Everything from really smooth morphing and evolving sounds to abrupt and dramatic changes (you can even drag and drop different sounds from sound browser and drop them directly into one of the four corners of the morphing pad/square). So things can get quite far from classic DX7 sounds and other generic fm sounds.


Is this like parameter interpolation?rjungemann
CJ Miller wrote:
Is this like parameter interpolation?


You can basically map separate presets to 4 corners of a square, and smoothly interpolate between them to create evolving sounds. So, preset interpolation would be a good name for it.Etan
rjungemann wrote:
CJ Miller wrote:
Is this like parameter interpolation?


You can basically map separate presets to 4 corners of a square, and smoothly interpolate between them to create evolving sounds. So, preset interpolation would be a good name for it.

Like rjungemann said, but unfortunately you cannot morph all parameters but only:

-operator frequency settings,
-operator X (noise source) and Z (dual filter) parameters
-fm matrix amounts and effect amounts

All these settings are interpolated. Also different operator waveforms can be saved in the morphing "preset" but they are not interpolated, just switched.

Other settings are not morphable. It would be awesome if you could also morph envelopes and LFOs and other mod sources amounts.Rex Coil 7
CJ Miller wrote:
You can try Operator or FM8 as trial software. So why not install and try them? Then you can tell us what you think.

If you are interested in Live routing flexibility, then why are you hoping it can replace Reaktor? Reaktor seems far more flexible to me. If you are so sold on Live's way of doing things, what do you prefer about it?
Every one of your questions has been answered in the posts I put up before you asked them.Rex Coil 7
slovo wrote:
I dunno why you wouldn't jump on Operator if you like it, but it's not cheap unless you want the other stuff too -- I like Collision and Sampler but not too enamored with the other Ableton instruments personally. FM8 is a much "better" instrument in that it is far more powerful, but Operator is extremely easy to use. I found the FM8 interface to be extremely unintuitive at first, but once I rtfm it's pretty amazing. Of course it's not as lightweight as Operator. You could probably run 100 instances of Operator at the same time with a fast CPU.

Also some may jump on me for saying this -- quite possibly I am not using the right settings on FM8 but I would say as a trend Operator has a bit of a "sweeter" (less harsh) tone out of the box. But again, unless you're desperate to conserve CPU, you can use FM8's brashness if you want, and also just mellow it out with with a FET compressor or something when you want that more-organic chip sound.
I remember in the late 70s I read an interview in Contemporary Keyboard magazine with Tom Coster .. he was the KB player with Santana for a while back then. He was describing how he perceived the ARP synths vs the Moog synths. He described the ARPs and being "feminine" sounding and the Moogs as being "masculine" sounding. He in no way meant his comments to be demeaning or dismissive or sexist, he made sure the reader understood his meaning.

I wonder if those descriptors may apply to the differences between the FM8 and Operator?

As far as cost is concerned, I fully intend on adding the Live 9 Suite upgrade to the Live 9 Standard level I have presently. Operator is included in that upgrade package (as well as Sampler and MAX4LIVE along with a minimum of twenty six programs/instruments/FX for M4L which include midi LFOs, some midi EGs, and many other fun gadgets. It also makes Live do this neat trick where you can "beatbox" into Live and it will write a midi drum sequence automatically directly taken from your beatbox inputs. It will also allow you to sing or hum in parts which it converts to midi sequences or even audio tracks. So the upgrade from Standard to Suite ($299) seems to offer quite a bit, including adding 44gb more samples.

I'm excited. It's good to feel happy.

So the idea here is if Operator were able to hold it's own with FM8 then I would be saving $200 bucks. I've seen any number of tutorial videos about programming the XM8 (for the most part it's ~generally~ like the FM7). The FM8 seems like it might be a good place to create a morphing lead synth sound at the cost of being a fatso and setting me back $200. On the other hand I wonder what Operator might produce in a multi-instance situation, and as someone mentioned (I think so anyhow) there's some inter-plug modulations possible with Live 9 (perhaps that is a trick Max4Live holds up it's sleeve that may be applied to a multi-instance Operator setup if required of it?)

It seems like the only certain weapon FM8 has going over Operator is it's matrix. Other than that it seems like any other feature may be replicated by just adding it within Live as part of a setup (that may be called something else, like a Scheme or something, I'm still learning Live's language). The 4-square fiddly bit that FM8 has can be replicated (and probably outgunned) by the clever use of the Behringer BCR2000.

Thanks for the help folks. I'll have a LOT to experiment with pretty soon. Between the Nord Micros, Dot Com modular, Kaoss Pad KP3, OPXProII, and the sample handling ability of Live 9 Suite I'll have a goodly ton of processing power at my disposal. I'm sure I'll have my work cut out for me. Which is another reason I am trying to keep the VST count low if possible. Oh well, I'll just have to see how it all shakes out, if I end up needing FM8 after all, then so be it, right?!?!CJ Miller
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Every one of your questions has been answered in the posts I put up before you asked them.


Well, I suppose it's convenient for you assume this to be the case. I mean, I guess that when anybody writes something, that they at least know what they meant. But having read your posts, my questions above occurred to me - not despite of, but rather because of what you wrote.

For somebody who starts so many posts, and asks so many questions, maybe you can appreciate that somebody would want to understand you better, and you could enjoy the opportunity to expand upon your earlier remarks. An opportunity to refine your ideas is always a good thing.Rex Coil 7
CJ Miller wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Every one of your questions has been answered in the posts I put up before you asked them.


Well, I suppose it's convenient for you assume this to be the case. I mean, I guess that when anybody writes something, that they at least know what they meant. But having read your posts, my questions above occurred to me - not despite of, but rather because of what you wrote.

For somebody who starts so many posts, and asks so many questions, maybe you can appreciate that somebody would want to understand you better, and you could enjoy the opportunity to expand upon your earlier remarks. An opportunity to refine your ideas is always a good thing.
You do not come across as someone who's "trying to get to know me better", you come across as though you are challenging my every statement and question as well as though you are mocking me. Just there you comment about the frequency of my posts, almost as if to complain about it, then you say you're trying to give me the opportnuity to post even more, which I perceive as mockery. This behavior seems to have taken on a pattern over a few days.

Perception is 100% of reality.

As far as being "somebody who starts so many posts, and asks so many questions" .. I've stated a number of times I am in the midst of making some upgrades to my studio and that I am one that prefers to research heavy purchases and plan out upgrades thoroughly prior to moving forward. The wealth of experience and knowledge among the membership here is a treasure trove of great information. I'd be a fool to ignore the opportunity to ask about things I am ignorant of prior to to spending money with this enormous information resource so accessible. If my frequent questions and research is bothersome, there's no reason anyone must read my posts or participate in my threads, right?

As soon as I get my plans sorted out and get this last phase of studio fittings I won't need to "starts so many posts, and ask so many questions".

Perhaps I have been misreading you over time, but you seem to be mocking me rather than someone interested in wanting to understand me better, and presenting me with the opportunity to expand upon my earlier remarks. If I have mistaken genuine efforts for "meme", I'd like to extend my honest apologies. However if you have - in fact - been having fun at my expense then expect no further response.

I'm just trying to learn about some things for some studio improvements prior to spending (wasting?) money on the project. My postings will end pretty soon, I'm nearly finished with my research (thanks to the help of so many people here).Rex Coil 7Returning to topic, I think that I'll see how well Operator works out after I get Live 9 Suite installed and running (which will happen after I complete my computer upgrades sometime over the next several weeks ahead). If it works out well enough, then upgrade completed. If not I'll try the FM8 demo to see if it offers anything that appeals to me more.

Thanks for the help everyone. As always I learned from this.

Lukatldr all above

i've used fm7, fm8 and operator for quiet a few years - well not so much in the last couple

i love operator. the interface is simple and easy to use. i think the interface leads me in certain directions which fm8 does not. i tend to create more percussive patches and traditional fm sounds.

fm8 is way more complex and hard to understand - maybe it is me. i gelled with fm7 but fm8 confused me from day 0 to even today. the routings are unintuitive and i find NI's envelope window navigation methods unusable. whenever i use fm8 i tend to make big pad sounds and that is about it - or maybe noise. i really gave it a shot but it doesn't click for me which is a shame because fm7 to me was like operator - easy to use and quick to compose with.

fm8 is definitely capable of amazing patches but in terms of total usage i think i lean on operator more.CJ Miller
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
You do not come across as someone who's "trying to get to know me better", you come across as though you are challenging my every statement and question as well as though you are mocking me. Just there you comment about the frequency of my posts, almost as if to complain about it, then you say you're trying to give me the opportnuity to post even more, which I perceive as mockery. This behavior seems to have taken on a pattern over a few days.


Observing what you do is not the same as judging it. I can relate more than you might suppose, as I too have at times retired for years, and wanted to play catch-up with what's going on. Also, I am often interested in the background behinds the many choices people make, with regards to both their tools and the content of their work. These are fundamentals which many gloss over. If I read somebody's grocery list, I might imagine a whole essay or story about why they chose those particular items. When did they decide that they were needed? Why those instead of something else? Just like I obsess over the technology of the tools, I obsess over the methodologies of their selection and their use - which I think are at least as interesting.

If it helps, I was pondering getting Live a few months ago, and decided against it. Also, I had used FM7 and Reaktor in Komplete 3, and was recently thinking about installing an update I have to FM8 and Reaktor. So your questions - and your decisions - have been of interest to me.

As for me, I often come across as either far too serious, or far too silly. My attempts at humor might seem snarky, but hopefully not insulting. I didn't feel as if I was prying with deeply personal questions, rather, I was just trying to participate in the discussion. Sorry if you find my lines of enquiry too annoying.havenI use both and tend to use FM8 and Aalto a lot more than Operator. Part of this is the GUI, I just dont "get" the Operator interface as intuitively as FM8 or Aalto. I find quick tweaks very easy in FM8 thanks to its Easy page which is basically a macro control over all FM operators. I prefer Aalto for 2op FM and FM8 for pads and leads.

I also find Operator to have less of a smooth sound on the high end of the spectrum when compared to FM8 and Aalto. This is running at 96k and I have not done blind testing.

That said building drum synth patches with Operator in a drum rack is a very rewarding experience. With the right macros and clip automation it can be very much like a more complex Machinedrum.

the OP should activate the demos of both.

I do not think Abletons parameter modulation is audio rate as has been speculated in this thread. The CPU overhead would be immense if this was the case. M4L can do audio rate modulation but you have to use audio cables to do so. This is the same in Reaktor, there is audio and modulation paths that run at different sampling rates. A fully audio rate modulation system is seen in Aalto and ACE.havenAlso the OP may want to keep in mind that the new U-He modular FM synth is coming soon. it does Casio style PM.

User Interface (UI) for FM synthesis tools is very important to me for getting results fast. Because of this I think it is very important to demo and to learn a tool as well as you can.

have fun!deastmanI find Operator to be a "fun little toy" to play around with. Of course, its integration with the other Live devices makes it useful, particularly when used as drum racks. FM8, on the other hand, is where I turn for serious FM synthesis. The modulation matrix is second to none, plus the versatile envelopes, effects section, arpeggiator, patch morphing, and the easy page for global adjustments...rjungemann
haven wrote:
I also find Operator to have less of a smooth sound on the high end of the spectrum when compared to FM8 and Aalto. This is running at 96k and I have not done blind testing.


Operator does provide some "smoother" waveforms which alias less at high frequencies. Doesn't totally solve the aliasing problem (all Digital FM synths have aliasing to some extent), but it's worth pointing out.

As an aside, I didn't know u-He was coming out with a Casio-style synth! Is there any information online?Rex Coil 7I learned some good things from the posts made in this thread. I've also learned that I am able to create some really great sounds by manipulating audio samples and using them in a sampler instrument to provide pitched/scaled control (play them with a keybaord or sequencer).

That said I'm taking a wait and see approach. I'll keep trying Live 9 and work up enough moolah to upgrade to Live 9 Suite which offers a few more ways to tweak audio. If I think I need more towards the "FM" realm I'll invest in FM8.

Some very good points were made in this thread, thanks to everyone that has helped me move forward. I'm nearly done with mapping out how I will complete this most recent round of additions to my synth studio. I have a fixed amount of money to work with so I have had to really work on getting things planned out.

Nearly there, thanks to all the help from the entire forum, as well as everyone tolerating my questions. I'll need to bug the Expert Sleepers subforum dwellers for a few weeks, so you all may want to send your condolences to them.

I've taken my computer upgrade questions to another internet forum to reduce my presence here as well.

Thanks again everyone!Rex Coil 7
deastman wrote:
I find Operator to be a "fun little toy" to play around with. Of course, its integration with the other Live devices makes it useful, particularly when used as drum racks. FM8, on the other hand, is where I turn for serious FM synthesis. The modulation matrix is second to none, plus the versatile envelopes, effects section, arpeggiator, patch morphing, and the easy page for global adjustments...
Just a quick set of questions on this ....

Operator has that thing where you can draw waveforms in about ~any~ shape, and it also has access to all of the FX within Live, as well as the arpeggiator and midi sequencer within Live and Max4Live .... doesn't that kinda cancel out those advantages FM8 offers?

See, I can't help but wonder if you compared the two with both being as well armed if Operator would still be a toy by comparison? As was pointed out earlier, FM8 is quite a bit more CPU heavy. So if as many resources were applied to Operator until it matched CPU usage with FM8, would the performance gap still be as wide between them?

I'm not trying to look all smart here or be sarcastic or make you look unthinking, I am actually just kinda asking an honest set of questions here, ok? (Just trying to not be misread, I have a talent for coming across badly).

Thanks...

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